The Cloisters gardens (courtesy TimWilson at Flickr CC)What do the Web and the Middle Ages have in common?

Use the electronic one to enjoy the other.

One of my favorite, most atmospheric art museums is The Cloisters, which is the medieval arts branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

They are particularly well-known for their period garden, filled with historic herbs that sound so much more elegant with their Latin names….Calamintha nepeta, Tanacetum parthenium, Origanum dictamnus….

On my last visit there, I sat on one of the benches, closed my eyes and listened to the Gregorian chants that were piped through the outdoor speakers into the garden, and enjoyed the chance to drift back into history while firmly ensconced in the modern world.

Now, if I want to dive into gardening at The Cloisters or medieval agriculture or plants in medieval art, I can visit their blog, The Medieval Garden Enclosed.  The major blog post author seems to be staff horticulturist Deirdre Larkin, who is featured in this article about the Cloisters gardens in The Herb Companion.

Holy smokes, but do I love the deep dives that you can make into the most obscure subjects, courtesy of the Internet.

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I'm a writer and speaker specializing in tourism, travel and social media. NHRA drag racing fan. Co-founder of Tourism Currents. U.S. Navy veteran. Caffeinated.